‘Two Suns’ Phenomena Remains Unexplained (Video)

OMG, X-files — By Goran on 2011/03/08 8:03 AM

Days after two suns were caught on camera in Taiwan, scientists are still having a rough time trying to explain what exactly we’re looking at.

Website “Life’s Little Mysteries” sought out expert advice from Jim Kaler, the University of Illinois astronomer, and he believes that the second sun was caused by atmospheric refraction.

He admitted, however, that the phenomena is not fully understood, reports Salem News.

“I doubt it’s been computer modeled. There must have been some blob of atmosphere somewhere that caused this truly spectacular phenomenon, which in a sense is a mirage,” said Kaler.

Not completely satisfied with his partial explanation, Mysteries asked Grant Perry for his opinion.

An atmospheric scientist at the University of Wisconsin Cooperative Institute for Satellite and Meteorological Studies, Perry admitted that he too is a bit mystified.

“This is not a common optical phenomenon that we’re seeing here. You would have to assume it is particles of ice or something in the atmosphere aligned in such a way that they would refract the sunlight at that very small angle, but only in one direction. It would require some fairly peculiar characteristics,” Perry explained.

However, some explanations offered by scientists are fairly down-to-earth.

“Many photographs are sent to me each year that look like the Taiwan sighting. Some have more than two suns. They are almost invariably artifacts, the result of shooting through windows or using plane filters on the camera.”

“In brief, it is almost certainly a reflection owing to shooting through a window,” said Les Cowley, who runs a British website called Atmospheric Optics, to ABC News.

Key words are – almost certainly!

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  • http://twitter.com/yishenglin Yi-Sheng Lin

    I want to correct something about this news. The picture is taken from Penghu, “Taiwan”. It’s NOT from China! I hope you guys will understand. I don’t want to see this mistake again!

  • http://dailypicksandflicks.com PicksAndFlicks

    It has been corrected. The source was saying China.

  • SparkyJP

    If Betelgeuse went supernova today it would take 650 years for the light to reach earth (It’s 650 light years away!!). The second sun that you’ll see in the sky is Elenin (Planet X). You can view the JPL orbital tool located here:

    http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/sbdb.cgi?sstr=C%2F2010%20X1;orb=1;cad=0;cov=0;log=0#orb

    If you align Elenin w/earth & the sun, you will notice the last 2 times it was in line was Feb 27, 2010 (Chile’s earthquake) and March 11, 2011 (Japan’s Earthquake). Coincidence? You decide cause’ it could be a white knuckle ride!!

  • http://forum.cosenascoste.com/universo-astronomia-spazio/59231-due-soli-visti-taiwan-6.html#post787667 Due soli visti in Taiwan

    [...] [...]

  • Jonathandeane

    I life in Florida and have seen this in person, during the summer I thought I was going to melt and everything got super bright. I looked up to see a second sun and thought I was hallucinating or something…  I asked the people around me about it and they seemed to be unimpressed with seeing it. (They probably did not realize the rarity of it.) However I do have a book from the early 1900′s called “Unusual Natural Weather Phenomena” and it was also explained as either ice crystals or differential temperatures in the upper atmosphere, the second explanation would be closely related to seeing heat mirages in the road that look like pools of water or the sky reflected. Very cool that they caught this on video and it is fun to see.

  • Jonathandeane

    life=live, damned typo monster got me.

  • http://randtair.com/ Dell Ledermann

    Aw, do you have a video with subtitles? I can’t understand Chinese… Hm, the theory about the reflection of the sun must be true! This incident probably caused some fuss among the people living there! It may even have had a psychological effect on the people, aside from the heat of the summer. How often does this happen?

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